PISTOL SHOOTING

Some weeks' since we re-published from the "New Era" of this city, the following challenge:—

A correspondent of the New Era, under the signature of W.S. offers, through the columns of that paper, to name a gentleman who will put up $10,000, and which amount will be covered with $20,000 more, if wished, to fire at a target with pistol or rifle, any distance that may be agreed upon. These amounts are up against any shots in the world. The person referred to has made the following shots: Target size of a 25 cent piece, distance 40 yards, a pistol in each hand—fired that right hand pistol, and hit the centre of the target; fired the left hand pistol with the left hand, and placed the ball on the first one: retreated 25 yards, making 65 yards, fired a third pistol, and hit target. He has shot 17 out of 18 pigeons flying, with pistol. He will, at 40 yards, shoot a pistol against any rifle in the world!

The editor of the "Pennant," a respectable daily journal, published in St. Louis, Mo., endorses to us, in that paper of the 16th, the annexed acceptance:—

To W.S., correspondent of the N.Y. New Era:

Sir: In glancing over the Pennant of the 12th inst., I chanced to see an article copied from the N.Y. New Era, purporting to be a challenge against any pistol shot in the world!

I accept the banter, under the following conditions, and will meet you half way:

1st. We will fire at a distance of thirty five paces, at common clay pipe stems, the one breaking the most out of fifty shots to take the wager, (the pipe stems to be placed by judges chosen for the occasion.)

2d. I will shoot a pistol either with my right or left hand at your discretion, and beat you at your favorite distance. The amount of each bet to be named by yourself, but to be over a thousand dollars. The shooting in all instances to be done at the word.

NOTE:—The above is a bona fide offer, and the name of the gentleman making it is left with us.—Ed. Pennant.


Notes:

Source: New York Spirit of the Times, 11.27 (4 Sept. 1841): 318. (Alderman Library,University of Virginia).

Joe Essid, University of Richmond English Department, prepared this typescript.

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